Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Windows 7 Videos how to do


Featured video: Making a desktop background slide show
Click to play video
This video shows you how to create a slide show of pictures on your desktop. (3:34)

Make older programs run in this version of Windows

Most programs written for Windows Vista also work in this version of Windows, but some older programs might run poorly or not at all. If a program written for an earlier version of Windows doesn't run correctly, you can try changing the compatibility settings for the program, either manually or by using the Program Compatibility troubleshooter.

Watch this video to learn how to make older programs run in this version of Windows (1:26)
Click to watch the video

If changing the settings doesn't fix the problem, go to the program manufacturer's website to see if there is an update for the program.

Warning

Warning

Do not use the Program Compatibility troubleshooter on older antivirus programs, disk utilities, or other system programs because it might cause data loss or create a security risk.

To run the Program Compatibility troubleshooter

  1. Open the Program Compatibility troubleshooter by clicking the Start button Picture of the Start button, and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type troubleshooter, and then clickTroubleshooting. Under Programs, click Run programs made for previous versions of Windows.

  2. Follow the instructions in the troubleshooter.

If you cannot install a program, insert the installation disc for the program and, using the troubleshooter, browse to the program's setup file, usually called Setup.exe, Install.exe, or something similar. The troubleshooter is not designed to work on programs that have an .msi file name extension.

Tip

Tip

You can also open the Program Compatibility troubleshooter by right-clicking a program's icon or shortcut and then clicking Troubleshoot compatibility.

Upgrading from Windows Vista to Windows 7

We highly recommend that you print this tutorial. Your computer will restart during theWindows 7 installation process, so having a printed copy will help you follow the steps if you can't return to this webpage.

Illustration of upgrading to Windows 7The Upgrade option moves your files, settings, and programs from Windows Vista to Windows 7.

Introduction

Depending on your hardware and your current edition ofWindows Vista, you can use the Upgrade option duringWindows 7 installation to upgrade from Windows Vista to a corresponding or higher edition of Windows 7.

Upgrading is the most convenient way to get Windows 7on your computer, because it keeps your files, settings, and programs from Windows Vista in place.

If your current edition of Windows Vista can't be upgraded to the edition of Windows 7 that you want to use, you can still install Windows 7 by using the Custom installation option instead. However, the Custom option doesn't preserve your files, programs, or settings. For a step-by-step tutorial on how to perform a custom installation, see Upgrading from Windows Vista to Windows 7 (custom installation).

Make sure that your programs and devices will work with Windows 7

Since your computer is running Windows Vista, it meets the system requirements for Windows 7. We still recommend that you download and run the free Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor from the Windows 7Upgrade Advisor webpage on the Microsoft website. It helps find potential issues with your computer’s hardware, devices, or programs that might affect installing Windows 7, and gives recommendations on what to do.

Also, go to the Windows 7 Compatibility Center to see what works with Windows 7 and find direct links to drivers, updates, and downloads.

Next: Learn about the upgrade options for Windows 7.

Upgrading from Windows XP to Windows 7

We highly recommend that you print this tutorial. Your PC will restart during the Windows 7 installation process, so having a printed copy will help you follow the steps if you're unable to return to this webpage.

Click to play video
Watch this video to learn more about upgrading from Windows XP to Windows 7. (3:07)

Introduction

To upgrade your PC from Windows XP to Windows 7, you'll need to select the Custom option duringWindows 7 installation. A custom installation doesn't preserve your programs, files, or settings. It's sometimes called a "clean" installation for that reason.

A custom installation is more complex, and it can sometimes take a couple of hours to complete. We created this five-step tutorial to help guide you through the entire process each step of the way.

What you need

  • An external hard disk. You'll need to move your files off of your PC before you install Windows 7. To make this easier, we recommend a free download called Windows Easy Transfer, which will require an external hard disk. They’re readily available at electronics and office supply stores, and they provide an easy way to add additional storage space to your computer.

  • The original installation discs or setup files for the programs that you want to use withWindows 7. You’ll need to reinstall your programs by hand after installing Windows 7. When you runWindows Easy Transfer you will get a report that lists the programs that you are currently using withWindows XP.

32-bit or 64-bit: Which version of Windows 7 to install?

Both 32-bit and 64-bit installation discs are included in the Windows 7 package. 64-bit operating systems can handle large amounts of memory—typically 4 gigabytes (GB) of random access memory (RAM) or more—more efficiently than 32-bit operating systems. However, not all computers are 64-bit capable. For more information, see 32-bit and 64-bit Windows: frequently asked questions.

You'll probably need the 32-bit version, but to make sure right-click My Computer, and then clickProperties.

  • If you don’t see "x64 Edition" listed, then you’re running the 32-bit version of Windows XP. Step 1 of this tutorial will show you how to run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor, which can let you know if your comptuer is capable of running the 64-bit version of Windows 7.

  • If "x64 Edition" is listed under System, you’re running the 64-bit version of Windows XP and can run the 64-bit version of Windows 7.

Next: Download and run the Windows 7 Upgrade Advisor.

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